POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por SiX el Vie 10 Sep 2010 - 10:29




Petty Officer First Class Marcus Luttrell was born in Huntsville, Texas in 1975.

A graduate of BUD/S Class 228, he was the only survivor of the fateful events of June 28, 2005 in Afghanistan. Luttrell and three teammates from SEAL Team TEN were assigned to a reconnaissance mission, operation RED WING, in the Hindu-Kush mountain region of Afghanistan. Their objective was to gather intelligence on Taliban movement in the area. Luttrell’s team was eventually discovered and outnumbered by over 200 Taliban fighters. Petty Officer Luttrell was the only to survive enemy contact. In the rescue mission that ensued, 16 Special Forces personnel, including 8 SEALs, died when their helicopter was shot down by Taliban fighters. It was the largest single-day loss of life in the SEALs’ history.

In 2006, Petty Officer Luttrell was awarded the Navy Cross for combat heroism.

His full story is documented in his heroic account of the operation, entitled: Lone Survivor.



Read more...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcus_Luttrell

http://www.navyseals.com/marcus-luttrell

http://sealteamspartan.foroes.org/operaciones-y-seals-famosos-famous-operations-and-seals-f17/operation-redwing-june-28-2005-t35.htm




Última edición por SiX el Mar 10 Abr 2012 - 3:44, editado 1 vez







...............................
"Que le den por culo al Pato Mickey"

http://www.facebook.com/pages/SEAL-Team-Spartan/216455738374002

Keep Low. Move Fast. Kill First. Die Last. One Shot. One Kill. No Luck. Pure Skill.

SiX
ALPHA Squad · S06

Mensajes : 12404
Fecha de inscripción : 01/05/2010
Edad : 27
Localización : Málaga

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Sáb 11 Sep 2010 - 9:56

The Sole Survivor

A Navy Seal, Injured and Alone, Was Saved By Afghans' Embrace and Comrades' Valor


By Laura Blumenfeld
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, June 11, 2007; Page A01

Marcus Luttrell, a fierce, 6-foot-5 rancher's son from Texas, lay in the dirt. His face was shredded, his nose broken, three vertebrae cracked from tumbling down a ravine. A Taliban rocket-propelled grenade had ripped off his pants and riddled him with shrapnel.
As the helicopters approached, Luttrell, a petty officer first class, turned on his radio. Dirt clogged his throat, leaving him unable to speak. He could hear a pilot: "If you're out there, show yourself."
It was June 2005. The United States had just suffered its worst loss of life in Afghanistan since the invasion in 2001. Taliban forces had attacked Luttrell's four-man team on a remote ridge shortly after 1 p.m. on June 28. By day's end, 19 Americans had died. Now U.S. aircraft scoured the hills for survivors.
There would be only one. Luttrell's ordeal -- described in exclusive interviews with him and 14 men who helped save him -- is among the more remarkable accounts to emerge from Afghanistan. It has been a dim and distant war, where after 5 1/2 years about 26,000 U.S. troops remain locked in conflict.
Out of that darkness comes this spark of a story. It is a tale of moral choices and of prejudices transcended. It is also a reminder of how challenging it is to be a smart soldier, and how hard it is to be a good man.
Luttrell had come to Afghanistan "to kill every SOB we could find." Now he lay bleeding and filthy at the bottom of a gulch, unable to stand. "I could see hunks of metal and rocks sticking out of my legs," he recalled.
He activated his emergency call beacon, which made a clicking sound. The pilots in the HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopters overhead could hear him.
"Show yourself," one pilot urged. "We cannot stay much longer." Their fuel was dwindling as morning light seeped into the sky, making them targets for RPGs and small-arms fire. The helicopters turned back.
As the HH-60s flew to Bagram air base, 80 miles away, one pilot told himself, "That guy's going to die."
Luttrell never felt so alone. His legs, numb and naked, reminded him of another loss. He had kept a magazine photograph of a World Trade Center victim in his pants pocket. Luttrell didn't know the man but carried the picture on missions. He killed in the man's unknown name.
Now Luttrell's camouflage pants had been blasted off, and with them, the victim's picture. Luttrell was feeling lightheaded. His muse for vengeance was gone.

Hunting a Taliban Leader

Luttrell's mission had begun routinely. As darkness fell on Monday, June 27, his Seal team fast-roped from a Chinook helicopter onto a grassy ridge near the Pakistan border. They were Navy Special Operations forces, among the most elite troops in the military: Lt. Michael P. Murphy and three petty officers -- Matthew G. Axelson, Danny P. Dietz and Luttrell. Their mission, code-named Operation Redwing, was to capture or kill Ahmad Shah, a Taliban leader. U.S. intelligence officials believed Shah was close to Osama bin Laden.
Luttrell, 32, is a twin. His brother was also a Seal. Each had half of a trident tattooed across his chest, so that standing together they completed the Seal symbol. They were big, visceral, horse-farm boys raised by a father Luttrell described admiringly as "a hard man."
"He made sure we knew the world is an unforgiving, relentless place," Luttrell said. "Anyone who thinks otherwise is totally naive."
Luttrell, who deployed to Afghanistan in April 2005 after six years in the Navy, including two years in Iraq, welcomed the moral clarity of Kunar province. He would fight in the mountains that cradled bin Laden's men. It was, he said, "payback time for the World Trade Center. My goal was to double the number of people they killed."
The four Seals zigzagged all night and through the morning until they reached a wooded slope. An Afghan man wearing a turban suddenly appeared, then a farmer and a teenage boy. Luttrell gave a PowerBar to the boy while the Seals debated whether the Afghans would live or die.
If the Seals killed the unarmed civilians, they would violate military rules of engagement; if they let them go, they risked alerting the Taliban. According to Luttrell, one Seal voted to kill them, one voted to spare them and one abstained. It was up to Luttrell.
Part of his calculus was practical. "I didn't want to go to jail." Ultimately, the core of his decision was moral. "A frogman has two personalities. The military guy in me wanted to kill them," he recalled. And yet: "They just seemed like -- people. I'm not a murderer."
Luttrell, by his account, voted to let the Afghans go. "Not a day goes by that I don't think about that decision," he said. "Not a second goes by."
At 1:20 p.m., about an hour after the Seals released the Afghans, dozens of Taliban members overwhelmed them. The civilians he had spared, Luttrell believed, had betrayed them. At the end of a two-hour firefight, only he remained alive. He has written about it in a book going on sale tomorrow, "Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of Seal Team 10."
Daniel Murphy, whose son Michael was killed, said he was comforted when "Mike's admiral said, 'Don't think these men went down easy. There were 35 Taliban strewn on the ground.' "
Before Murphy was shot, he radioed Bagram: "My guys are dying."
Help came thundering over the ridgeline in a Chinook carrying 16 rescuers. But at 4:05 p.m., as the helicopter approached, the Taliban fighters fired an RPG. No one survived.
"It was deathly quiet," Luttrell recalled. He crawled away, dragging his legs, leaving a bloody trail. The country song "American Soldier" looped through his mind. Round and round, in dizzying circles, whirled the words "I'll bear that cross with honor."
News of a Crash

In southwestern Afghanistan, at the Kandahar air field, Maj. Jeff Peterson, 39, sat in the briefing room with his feet up on the table, watching the puppet movie "Team America: World Police."
Peterson was a full-time Air Force reservist from Arizona, known as Spanky because he resembles the scamp from "The Little Rascals." He was passing a six-week stint with other reservists he called "old farts." In three days they would head home, leaving behind the smell of burning sewage and the sound of giant camel spiders crunching mouse bones.
Someone flipped on the television news. A Chinook had crashed up north.
Peterson flew an HH-60 for the 305th Rescue Squadron. Motto: "Anytime, anywhere." Their rescues had been minor. "An Afghani kid with a blown-up hand or a soldier with a blown-up knee," Peterson recalled in an interview at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson.
That was okay with him. Twelve men, including Peterson's best friend, had died during training in a midair collision in 1998. The accident, he said, "took the wind out of my life sails." He just wanted to serve and get back to his wife, Penny, and their four small boys.
Peterson is dimply, 5 feet 8, and describes himself with a smile as "an idiot. A full-on, certified idiot." He almost flunked out of flight school because he kept getting airsick. While the other pilots downed lasagna, he nibbled saltines. He had trouble in survival training because they had to slaughter rabbits: "I didn't want to kill the bunny."
Peterson dealt with stress by joking, singing "Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood" songs on missions: It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
Now, with the news of the Chinook crash, the tension in the Kandahar briefing room amped up as a call came over the radio. Bagram needed them. Peterson grabbed his helmet and a three-day pack. He asked himself, "What is this about?"

Encounter With a Villager

The Seal wondered whether he was dying -- if not from the bullet that had pierced his thigh, then surely of thirst. "I was licking sweat off my arms," Luttrell recalled. "I tried to drink my urine."
Crawling through the night, as Spanky Peterson's HH-60 flew overhead with other search helicopters, he made it to a pool of water. When he lifted his head, he saw an Afghan. He reached for his rifle.
"American!" the villager said, flashing two thumbs-up. "Okay! Okay!"
"You Taliban?" Luttrell asked.
"No Taliban!"
The villager's friends arrived, carrying AK-47s. They began to argue, apparently determining Luttrell's fate. "I kept saying to myself, 'Quit being a little bitch. Stand up and be a man.' "
But he couldn't stand. Three men lifted 240 pounds of dead weight and carried Luttrell to the 15-hut village of Sabray. They took his rifle.
What happened next baffled him. Mohammed Gulab, 33, father of six, fed Luttrell warm goat's milk, washed his wounds and clothed him in what Luttrell called "man jammies."
"I didn't trust them," Luttrell said. "I was confused. They'd reassure me, but hell, it wasn't in English."
Hours after his arrival, Taliban fighters appeared and demanded that the villagers surrender the American. They threatened Gulab, Luttrell said, and tried to bribe him. "I was waiting for a good deal to come along and for Gulab to turn me over.
"I'd been in so many villages. I'd be like, 'Up against the wall, and shut the hell up!' So I'm like, why would these people be kind to me?" Luttrell said. "I probably killed one of their cousins. And now I'm shot up, and they're using all the village medical supplies to help me."
What Luttrell did not understand, he said, was that the people of Sabray were following their own rules of engagement -- tribal law. Once they had carried the invalid Seal into their huts, they were committed to defend him. The Taliban fighters seemed to respect that custom, even as they lurked in the hills nearby.
During the day, children would gather around Luttrell's cot. He touched their noses and said "nose"; the children taught him words in Pashtun. At prayer time, he kneeled as best he could, wincing from shrapnel wounds. A boy said in Arabic, "There is no god but Allah." Marcus repeated: "La ilaha illa Allah."
"Once you say that, you become a Muslim -- you're good to go," he said. Luttrell offered his own unspoken prayer to Jesus: "Get me out of here."
On several occasions, he heard helicopters. In one of them was Peterson. Come on, dude, show yourself, Peterson would silently say, looking down into the trees. At dawn, as Peterson flew back from a search, he felt his stomach sink. We failed.
On July 1, with Taliban threats intensifying, Gulab's father, the village elder, decided to seek help at a Marine outpost five miles down in the valley. Luttrell wrote a note: "This man gave me shelter and food, and must be helped."
The old man tramped down the mountain.

Preparing a Rescue

At 1 a.m. on July 2, Staff Sgt. Chris Piercecchi, 32, an Air Force pararescue jumper, picked up Gulab's father at the Marine outpost. He flew with him to Bagram. "He was this wise, older person with a big, old beard," Piercecchi recalled. Gulab's father handed over Luttrell's note and described the Seal's trident tattoo.
U.S. commanders drew up rescue plans. "It was one of the largest combat search-and-rescue operations since Vietnam," said Lt. Col. Steve Butow, who directed the air component from a classified location in Southwest Asia.
Planners first considered sending a Chinook to get Luttrell, while Peterson's HH-60 would wait five miles away to evacuate casualties. But the smaller HH-60, the planners concluded, could navigate the turns approaching Sabray more easily than a lumbering Chinook.
"Sixties, you got the pickup," the mission commander said to the HH-60 pilots.
"I was like, 'Holy cow, dude, how am I not going to screw this up?' " Peterson recalled. His chest felt tight. He had never flown in combat. "You want to do your mission, but once you're out, you're like, damn, I'd rather be watching the American puppet movie."
At 10:05 p.m. -- five nights after Luttrell's four-man team had set out -- Peterson climbed aboard with his reservist crew: a college student, a doctor, a Border Patrol pilot, a former firefighter and a hard-of-hearing Vietnam vet.
First Lt. Dave Gonzales, 41, Peterson's copilot, recalled that he felt for his rosary beads. "If you guys are praying guys, make sure you're praying now," Gonzales said. Master Sgt. Josh Appel, 39, the doctor, had never asked for God's help before. His father was Jewish, and his mother was a German Christian: "I don't even know what god I was talking to."
They flew for 40 minutes toward the dead-black mountains. Voices from pilots -- A-10 attack jets and AC-130 gunships flying cover -- droned over five frequencies. Peterson's crew was quiet, breathing a greasy mix of JP-8 jet fuel fumes and hot rubber.
As they climbed from 1,500 to 7,000 feet, Peterson asked about the engines: "What's my power?" In thin air, extra weight can be deadly. He didn't want to dump fuel; they were flying over a village. But he could sense the engines straining through the vibrations in the pedals.
Peterson broke the safety wire on the fuel switch. "Sorry, guys," he said, looking down at the roofs. He felt bad for the people below, but he needed to lighten the aircraft if he wanted to survive. Five hundred pounds of fuel gushed out. "That's for Penny and the boys."
Five minutes before the helicopter reached Sabray, U.S. warplanes -- guided by a ground team that had hiked overland -- attacked the Taliban fighters ringing the houses. "They started shwacking the bad guys," Peterson recalled. The clouds lit up from the explosions. The radio warned, "Known enemy 100 meters south of your position." The back of Peterson's neck prickled.
At 11:38 p.m., they descended into the landing zone, a ledge on a terraced cliff. The rotors spun up a blinding funnel of dirt. The aircraft wobbled, drifting left toward a wall and then right toward a cliff. Piercecchi lay down, bracing for a crash. Master Sgt. Mike Cusick, 57, the flight engineer who had been a gunner in Vietnam, screamed, "Stop left! Stop right!"
"I'm going to screw up," Peterson recalled thinking. He thought of his best friend's wife, how she howled when he told her that her husband, a pilot, had crashed. "Don't let this happen to Penny."
Then, suddenly, through the brown cloud, a bush appeared. An orientation point.
Luttrell was crouching with Gulab on the ground, watching them land. The static electricity from the rotors glowed green. "That was the most nervous I'd been," Luttrell said. "I was waiting for an RPG to blast the helicopter."
Gulab helped Luttrell limp through the rotor wash. Piercecchi and Appel jumped out and saw two men dressed in billowing Afghan robes.
Appel trained the laser dot of his M4 on Luttrell. "Bad guys or good guys?" Appel recalled wondering. "I hope I don't have to shoot them."
Someone shouted: "He's your precious cargo!"
Piercecchi performed an identity check, based on memorized data: "What's your dog's name?"
Luttrell: "Emma!"
Piercecchi: "Favorite superhero?"
"Spiderman!"
Piercecchi shook his hand. "Welcome home."
Luttrell and Gulab climbed into the helicopter. During the flight, Gulab "was latched onto my knee like a 3-year-old," Luttrell recalled. When they landed and were separated, Gulab seemed confused. He had refused money and Luttrell's offer of his watch.
"I put my arms around his neck," Luttrell recalled, "and said into his ear, 'I love you, brother.' " He never saw Gulab again.

The Lessons

Two years have passed. Peterson, back in Tucson, realizes he may not be "a big idiot" after all. "I feel like I could do anything," he said.
On a recent evening, he took his boys to a Cub Scout meeting. The theme: "Cub Scouts in Shining Armor." The den leader said: "A knight of the Round Table was someone who was very noble, who stood up for the right things. Remember what it is to be a knight, okay?"
Peterson's boys nodded, wearing Burger King crowns that Penny had spray-painted silver.
Peterson had never spoken to Luttrell, neither in the helicopter nor afterward. Last month, the Seal phoned him.
"Hey, buddy," he said. "This is Marcus Luttrell. Thank you for pulling me off that mountain."
Peterson whooped.
Such happy moments have been rare for Luttrell. After recuperating, he deployed to Iraq, returning home this spring. His injuries from Afghanistan still require a "narcotic regimen." He feels tormented by the death of his Seal friends, and he avoids sleeping because they appear in his dreams, shrieking for help.
Three weeks ago, while in New York, Luttrell visited Ground Zero. On an overcast afternoon, he looked down into the pit. The World Trade Center is his touchstone as a warrior. He had linked Sept. 11 to the people of Afghanistan: "I didn't go over there with any respect for these people."
But the villagers of Sabray taught him something, he said.
"In the middle of everything evil, in an evil place, you can find goodness. Goodness. I'd even call it godliness," he said.
As Luttrell talked, he walked the perimeter fence. His gait was hulking, if not menacing, his voice angry, engorged with pain. "They protected me like a child. They treated me like I was their eldest son."
Below Luttrell in the pit, earthmovers were digging; construction workers in orange vests directed a beeping truck. Luttrell kept talking. "They brought their cousins brandishing firearms . . . ." The cranes clanked. "And they brought their uncles, to make sure no Taliban would kill me . . . "
Luttrell kept talking over the banging and the hammering of a place that would rise again.





Traducción automática:
El único sobreviviente

Un sello de la Marina, heridos y solos, fue salvado por los afganos "Embrace y Valor Camaradas '


Por Laura Blumenfeld
The Washington Post Redactor del Servicio Noticioso
Lunes, 11 de junio 2007, página A01

Marcus Luttrell, laico feroz, el hijo de 6-pies-5 ranchero de Texas, en la tierra. Su rostro estaba destrozado, la nariz rota, tres vértebras se quebró de caer por un barranco. Una granada propulsada por cohete talibán habían robado los pantalones y lo acribillaron con metralla.
Como los helicópteros se acercaron, Luttrell, un suboficial de primera clase, se convirtió en su radio. La suciedad obstruido la garganta, dejándolo incapaz de hablar. Podía oír a un piloto: "Si estás por ahí, muéstrate".
Era junio de 2005. Los Estados Unidos acababa de sufrir su peor derrota de la vida en Afganistán desde la invasión en 2001. fuerzas de los talibanes habían atacado Luttrell equipo de cuatro hombres en un canto a distancia poco después de 13:00 el 28 de junio. Al final del día, 19 estadounidenses habían muerto. Ahora aeronaves EE.UU. recorrió las colinas a los sobrevivientes.
No sería sólo una. prueba de Luttrell - descrito en entrevistas exclusivas con él y 14 hombres que ayudó a salvar él - es una de las cuentas más notable para salir de Afganistán. Ha sido una guerra lejana y oscura, donde después de 5 1 / 2 años sobre 26.000 soldados EE.UU. permanecen encerrados en conflicto.
Fuera de la oscuridad viene la chispa de una historia. Es una historia de elecciones morales y de los prejuicios trascendido. Es también un recordatorio de lo difícil que es ser un soldado inteligente, y lo difícil que es ser un buen hombre.
Luttrell había llegado a Afganistán "para matar a cada hijo de puta que encontramos." Ahora él yacía sangrando y sucio en el fondo de una quebrada, incapaz de soportar. "Podía ver trozos de metal y piedras que salen de mis piernas", recordó.
Se activó su baliza de llamada de emergencia, que hizo un sonido de clic. Los pilotos de los helicópteros HH-60 Pave Hawk sobrecarga podía oírle.
"Muestra que eres", instó a un piloto. "No podemos permanecer mucho más tiempo." Su combustible era su disminución, luz de la mañana se filtraba hacia el cielo, lo que los objetivos para los juegos de rol y disparos de armas pequeñas. Los helicópteros regresaron.
A medida que el HH-60 voló a la base aérea de Bagram, a 80 kilómetros de distancia, un piloto se dijo, "Ese hombre va a morir."
Luttrell nunca me sentí tan sola. Sus piernas, entumecimiento y desnudo, le recordaba a otra pérdida. Había conservado una fotografía de una víctima de la revista World Trade Center en el bolsillo del pantalón. Luttrell no conozco al hombre sino que llevó la imagen de las misiones. Mató de nombre desconocido del hombre.
Ahora los pantalones de camuflaje Luttrell se despegó, y con ellos, la víctima de foto. Luttrell se sentía mareado. Su musa de venganza se había ido.

Caza un líder talibán

Luttrell misión había comenzado de forma rutinaria. Cuando cayó la noche del lunes, 27 de junio su Sello equipo rápido con la cuerda desde un helicóptero Chinook en una cresta cubierta de hierba cerca de la frontera con Pakistán. Fueron las fuerzas de Operaciones Especiales de la Marina, entre las tropas de élite en el ejército: el teniente Michael P. Murphy y tres suboficiales - Matthew G. Axelson, Danny P. Dietz y Luttrell. Su misión, denominada Operación Redwing, era capturar o matar a Ahmad Shah, un líder talibán. EE.UU. funcionarios de inteligencia cree que Shah estaba a punto de Osama bin Laden.
Luttrell, de 32 años, es un gemelo. Su hermano también era un sello. Cada uno tenía la mitad de un tridente tatuado en el pecho, de modo que de pie juntos completado el símbolo del sello. Eran grandes, visceral, los chicos de granja de caballos criados por un padre con admiración Luttrell descrito como "un hombre duro."
"Él se aseguró de que sabía que el mundo es un lugar implacable, implacable", dijo Luttrell. "Cualquiera que piense lo contrario es totalmente ingenuo."
Luttrell, desplegados en Afganistán en abril de 2005 después de seis años en la Marina, incluyendo dos años en Irak, acogió con satisfacción la claridad moral de la provincia de Kunar. Él lucha en las montañas que acunó los hombres bin Laden. Era, dijo, "el tiempo de recuperación para el World Trade Center. Mi meta era duplicar el número de personas que mataron."
Los cuatro sellos zigzagueaba a través de toda la noche y la mañana hasta llegar a una ladera boscosa. Un hombre afgano con un turbante apareció de repente, a continuación, un agricultor y un adolescente. Luttrell dio un PowerBar al muchacho, mientras que los sellos debatieron si los afganos que viven o mueren.
Si los sellos mataron a civiles desarmados, violaría las normas militares de contratación, si los dejaron ir, corrían el riesgo de alertar a los talibanes. Según Luttrell, un sello de votó a favor de matarlos, uno votó a favor de ellas de repuesto y uno se abstuvo. Fue hasta Luttrell.
Parte de su cálculo era práctico. "Yo no quería ir a la cárcel." En última instancia, el núcleo de su decisión era moral. "Un hombre rana tiene dos personalidades. El tipo militar en mí quería matarlos", recordó. Y, sin embargo: "Ellos sólo parecía - la gente. No soy un asesino."
Luttrell, por su cuenta, votó a favor de dejar que los afganos ir. "No pasa un día que yo no pienso en esa decisión", dijo. "Ni un segundo se va."
A la 1:20 de la tarde, una hora después de los Seals de los afganos liberados, decenas de miembros del Talibán que las abruma. Los civiles que había ahorrado, cree Luttrell, los había traicionado. Al final de un tiroteo de dos horas, sólo se mantuvo vivo. Ha escrito sobre él en un libro sale a la venta mañana, "Lone Survivor: La Cuenta del testigo presencial de la Operación Redwing y Lost Héroes de Seal Team 10".
Daniel Murphy, cuyo hijo Michael murió, dijo que se consoló cuando "Almirante Mike dijo:" No creo que estos hombres bajaron fácil. Hubo 35 talibanes esparcidos por el suelo. " "
Antes de Murphy fue fusilado, por radio Bagram: "Mis hombres se están muriendo."
La ayuda llegó tronando sobre la cordillera en un Chinook transportaba a 16 equipos de rescate. Pero a las 4:05 pm, cuando el helicóptero se acercó, los combatientes talibanes dispararon un RPG. Nadie sobrevivió.
"Era silenciosa como la muerte", recordó Luttrell. Él echó a andar, arrastrando las piernas, dejando un rastro de sangre. La canción country "American Soldier" bucle a través de su mente. Vueltas y vueltas, en círculos vertiginosos, giró las palabras "voy a tener que cruzan con honor".
La noticia de un accidente

En el sudoeste de Afganistán, en el campo aéreo de Kandahar, el mayor Jeff Peterson, de 39 años, se sentó en la sala de prensa con los pies sobre la mesa, mirando la película de marionetas "Team America: World Police".
Peterson fue uno de tiempo completo de la Fuerza Aérea reservista de Arizona, conocido como Spanky, porque se parece al pícaro de "The Little Rascals". Estaba pasando una temporada de seis semanas con otros reservistas que él llamó "pedos de edad." En tres días que se dirigían a casa, dejando tras de sí el olor de las aguas residuales en llamas y el sonido de gigantes arañas camello crujido de huesos de ratón.
Alguien encendió las noticias de televisión. Un Chinook se estrelló en el norte.
Peterson voló un HH-60 para el Rescate 305to Escuadrón. Lema: "En cualquier momento y lugar". Su rescate había sido menor. "Un niño afgano con una mano-soplado hacia arriba o un soldado con una rodilla ampliadas", recordó Peterson en una entrevista en Davis-Monthan Air Force Base en Tucson.
Eso estaba bien con él. Doce hombres, entre ellos el mejor amigo de Peterson, había muerto durante el entrenamiento en una colisión en el aire en 1998. El accidente, dijo, "se llevó el viento de las velas de mi vida." Él sólo quería servir y volver a su esposa, Penny, y sus cuatro niños pequeños.
Peterson es dimply, 5 pies y 8, y se describe con una sonrisa como "un idiota. Un lleno-en, idiota certificado". Casi expulsado de la escuela de vuelo ya que no dejaba llegar mareado. Mientras que los otros pilotos derribados lasaña, mordisqueó galletitas saladas. Había problemas en el entrenamiento de supervivencia, porque tenían que conejos masacre: "Yo no quería matar al conejito."
Peterson tratado con el estrés, bromeando, cantando "Barrio El Sr. Rogers" canciones en las misiones: Es un hermoso día en el barrio.
Ahora, con la noticia del accidente Chinook, la tensión en la sala de prensa de Kandahar amplificado como llegó una llamada por la radio. Bagram los necesitaba. Peterson tomó su casco y un paquete de tres días. Se preguntó, "¿Qué es esto?

Encuentro con un aldeano

El sello se preguntó si se estaba muriendo - si no es de la bala que había atravesado el muslo, seguramente de sed. "Yo estaba lamiendo el sudor de mis brazos", recordó Luttrell. "Traté de beber mi orina".
Arrastrándose por la noche, como Spanky Peterson HH-60, sobrevoló con helicópteros de búsqueda, que llegó a un charco de agua. Cuando él levantó la cabeza, vio a un afgano. Tomó su rifle.
"American!" dijo el aldeano, el parpadeo dos pulgares hacia arriba. "¡Está bien! ¡Está bien!"
"Usted talibanes?" Luttrell preguntó.
"No talibanes!"
El aldeano amigos llegaron, llevando AK-47. Comenzaron a discutir, al parecer, decidieron el destino de Luttrell. "Me decía a mí mismo: 'Deja de ser una pequeña perra. Ponte de pie y ser un hombre." "
Pero no podía soportar. Tres hombres levantaron 240 libras de peso muerto y llevado a la aldea Luttrell 15-choza de Sabray. Se tomó su rifle.
Lo que sucedió después le desconcertaron. Gulab Mohammed, de 33 años, padre de seis hijos, alimentados con leche de cabra caliente de Luttrell, se lavó las heridas y le vistieron en lo que Luttrell llamada "pijamas hombre."
"No se fiaba de ellos", dijo Luttrell. "Yo estaba confundido. Habían tranquilizarme, pero el infierno, no fue en Inglés."
Horas después de su llegada, los combatientes talibanes apareció y exigió que los aldeanos entrega de la Americana. Amenazaron Gulab, dijo Luttrell, y trató de sobornarlo. "Estaba esperando una buena oferta para venir adelante y para que Gulab vez más de mí.
"He estado en tantos pueblos. Sería como, 'Contra la pared, y cerró el infierno para arriba!" Así que estoy buscando, ¿por qué esta gente sea amable conmigo? " Luttrell, dijo. "Es probable que mató a uno de sus primos. Y ahora estoy disparado, y que están usando todo el pueblo de suministros médicos para que me ayude."
¿Qué Luttrell no entendía, él dijo, era que el pueblo de Sabray estaban siguiendo sus propias reglas de compromiso - ley de la tribu. Una vez que se había llevado a la enferma Seal en sus chozas, en que se cometieron en su defensa. Los combatientes talibanes parecían respetar esa costumbre, incluso cuando se escondía en las colinas cercanas.
Durante el día, los niños se reunían alrededor de la cuna Luttrell. Se tocó la nariz y dijo que "la nariz", los niños le enseñó palabras en pastún. En el momento de la oración, se puso de rodillas lo mejor que pudo, haciendo una mueca de heridas de metralla. Un niño dijo en árabe: "No hay ningún dios sino Alá". Marcus repitió: "La ilaha illa Allah".
"Una vez que usted dice eso, usted se convierte en un musulmán - que es bueno ir", dijo. Luttrell ofreció su propia oración tácita a Jesús: "¡Sácame de aquí".
En varias ocasiones, oyó los helicópteros. En uno de ellos fue Peterson. Vamos, amigo, muéstrate, Peterson silencio diría, mirando hacia los árboles. Al amanecer, como Peterson regresó de una búsqueda, sentía que su fregadero estómago. Hemos fracasado.
El 1 de julio, con la intensificación de las amenazas talibanes, el padre de Gulab, el anciano de la aldea, decidió buscar ayuda en un puesto de avanzada cinco millas marinas en el valle. Luttrell escribió una nota: "Este hombre me dio techo y comida, y deben ser ayudados".
El viejo andado por la montaña.

Preparación de un rescate

En 1 a.m. el 2 de julio, el sargento. Chris Piercecchi, de 32 años, un puente de la Fuerza Aérea pararescue, recogió el padre de Gulab en el puesto de Marina. Él voló con él a Bagram. "Fue esta persona sabia, más viejo con una barba grande, viejo", recordó Piercecchi. Gulab padre de entrega de la nota Luttrell y describió tatuaje tridente del Sello.
comandantes de EE.UU. ha elaborado planes de rescate. "Fue una de las mayores operaciones de combate de búsqueda y rescate desde Vietnam", dijo el teniente coronel Steve Bütow, quien dirigió el componente aire de un lugar clasificado en el suroeste de Asia.
Los planificadores examinó por primera vez el envío de un Chinook para obtener Luttrell, mientras que Peterson HH-60 se espere cinco kilómetros de distancia para evacuar a las víctimas. Pero el más pequeño HH-60, los planificadores llegó a la conclusión, podían navegar las vueltas acercándose Sabray con más facilidad que un pesado Chinook.
"Años sesenta, ha llegado hasta la camioneta", dijo el comandante de la misión a los HH-60 pilotos.
"Yo estaba como, 'Holy cow, amigo, ¿cómo no me voy a tirar esto para arriba? "Peterson recordó. Su pecho sentí apretado. Él nunca había volado en combate. "¿Quieres hacer tu misión, pero una vez que estás fuera, usted es como, joder, prefiero estar viendo la película de marionetas estadounidenses".
A las 10:05 pm - cinco noches después de Luttrell equipo de cuatro hombres habían partido - Peterson subió a bordo con su tripulación reservista: un estudiante universitario, un médico, un piloto de la Patrulla Fronteriza, un ex bombero y un duro con problemas de audición Vietnam veterinario.
En primer lugar el teniente Dave González, de 41 años, copiloto de Peterson, recordó que él sentía por su rosario. "Si ustedes están orando chicos, asegúrese de que está rezando", dijo Gonzales. El sargento. Josh Appel, de 39 años, el médico, nunca había pedido la ayuda de Dios antes. Su padre era judío, y su madre era una cristiana alemana: "Yo ni siquiera sé lo que Dios me estaba hablando."
Volaron durante 40 minutos hacia las montañas muertos-negro. Las voces de los pilotos - A-10 de ataque y aviones AC-130 que enarbolen la cubierta - zumbaban más de cinco frecuencias. la tripulación de Peterson estaba en silencio, respirando una mezcla de grasa de la JP-8 humos chorro de combustible y goma caliente.
A medida que aumentó de 1.500 a 7.000 pies, Peterson preguntó acerca de los motores: "¿Cuál es mi poder?" En el aire, el peso adicional puede ser mortal. No quería deshacerse de combustible, sino que estaban volando sobre una aldea. Pero podía sentir el esfuerzo a través de los motores de las vibraciones en los pedales.
Peterson rompió el cable de seguridad en el interruptor de combustible. "Lo siento chicos," dijo, mirando a los tejados. Se sentía mal por la gente de abajo, pero que necesitaba para aligerar el avión si quería sobrevivir. Quinientas libras de combustible se derramaron. "Eso es para Penny y los muchachos."
Cinco minutos antes de que el helicóptero llegó Sabray, aviones de combate EE.UU. - guiado por un equipo de tierra que había ido de excursión por tierra - los combatientes del Talibán atacaron las casas de llamada. "Empezaron shwacking los chicos malos", recuerda Peterson. Las nubes iluminadas por las explosiones. La radio advirtió: "Conocido enemigo a 100 metros al sur de su posición." La parte posterior del cuello de Peterson erizó.
A las 11:38 pm, que descendió a la zona de aterrizaje, una cornisa en un acantilado en terrazas. Los rotores hilar un embudo el cegamiento de la suciedad. El avión se tambaleó, a la deriva a la izquierda hacia una pared y luego a la derecha hacia un precipicio. Piercecchi establecer, preparándose para un choque. El sargento. Mike Cusick, de 57 años, el ingeniero de vuelo que había sido artillero en Vietnam, gritó: "Stop a la izquierda! ¡Detente!"
"Me voy a tirar para arriba", recuerda Peterson pensar. Pensó en la mujer de su mejor amigo, ¿cómo aulló cuando él le dijo que su marido, un piloto, se había estrellado. "No deje que esto le suceda a Penny."
Entonces, de repente, a través de la nube marrón, un arbusto apareció. Un punto de referencia.
Luttrell estaba en cuclillas con Gulab en el suelo, mirando a aterrizar. La electricidad estática de los rotores brillaron intensamente verdes. "Eso fue el más nervioso que había sido", dijo Luttrell. "Yo estaba esperando un RPG para arruinar el helicóptero".
Gulab ayudado Luttrell cojeando a través de la estela del rotor. Piercecchi y Appel un salto y vio a dos hombres vestidos con túnicas ondulantes afgano.
Appel entrenado el punto de láser de su M4 en Luttrell. "Los malos o buenos?" Appel recordó preguntando. "Espero que no tengamos que disparar."
Alguien gritó: "Él es su preciosa carga!"
Piercecchi realiza un control de identidad, sobre la base de datos memorizados: "¿Cómo se llama tu perro?"
Luttrell: "Emma"
Piercecchi: "superhéroe favorito?"
"El Hombre Araña!"
Piercecchi le estrechó la mano. "Bienvenido a casa".
Luttrell Gulab y subió al helicóptero. Durante el vuelo, Gulab "se pegó a mi rodilla como una 3-años de edad", recordó Luttrell. Cuando desembarcaron y fueron separados, Gulab parecía confundido. Se había negado el dinero y ofrecer Luttrell de su reloj.
"Puse mis brazos alrededor de su cuello", recordó Luttrell ", y dijo al oído:« Te quiero, hermano. " "Nunca vi Gulab nuevo.

Las lecciones

Han pasado dos años. Peterson, de vuelta en Tucson, da cuenta de que no puede ser "un idiota grande" después de todo. "Me siento como si pudiera hacer nada", dijo.
En una noche reciente, tomó a sus muchachos a una reunión del Cub Scout. El tema: "Cub Scouts de brillante armadura." El líder del den, dijo: "Un caballero de la Mesa Redonda era alguien que era muy noble, que se puso de pie por las cosas correctas. Recuerde lo que es ser un caballero, ¿de acuerdo?"
los chicos de Peterson asintió, llevaba Burger King coronas que Penny había plata pintada con spray.
Peterson nunca había hablado con Luttrell, ni en el helicóptero, ni después. El mes pasado, el sello le llamó por teléfono.
"Oye, amigo", dijo. "Se trata de Marcus Luttrell. Gracias por sacarme de esa montaña."
Peterson gritó.
Tales momentos felices han sido raro que Luttrell. Después de recuperarse, fue enviado a Irak, de volver a casa esta primavera. Sus lesiones de Afganistán todavía requieren un régimen de "estupefacientes". Él se siente atormentado por la muerte de sus amigos del sello, y se evita dormir porque aparecen en sus sueños, gritando por ayuda.
Hace tres semanas, mientras que en Nueva York, Luttrell visitó la Zona Cero. En una tarde nublada, miró hacia abajo en el hoyo. El World Trade Center es su piedra de toque de guerrero. Él había vinculado 11 de septiembre al pueblo de Afganistán: "Yo no fui allá con todo respeto por estas personas."
Pero los aldeanos de Sabray le enseñó algo, dijo.
"En medio de todo mal, en un mal lugar, puede encontrar la bondad. Bondad. Yo incluso lo llaman la piedad", dijo.
Como Luttrell hablaba, se acercó la valla perimetral. Su andar era descomunal, si no amenazadora, su voz airada, repletas de dolor. "Ellos me protegió como un niño. Me trataron como si yo fuera su hijo mayor."
A continuación Luttrell en el foso, excavadoras estaban cavando; trabajadores de la construcción en los chalecos de color naranja dirigido un camión a sonar. Luttrell siguió hablando. "Ellos trajeron a sus primos blandiendo armas de fuego...." Las grúas sonaban. "Y ellos trajeron sus tíos, para asegurar que no me iba a matar talibanes..."
Luttrell siguió hablando sobre el golpe y el martilleo de un lugar que se levantaría otra vez.

doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Mar 21 Dic 2010 - 8:11

Marcus Luttrell, a former Navy SEAL whose story of heroism in Afghanistan is told in his book "Lone Survivor," shared his world view at the National Rifle Association event in Louisville on May 16, 2008

http://www.eyeblast.tv/public/video.aspx?RsrcID=2507

doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Mar 21 Dic 2010 - 8:11

Marcus Luttrell, un ex Navy SEAL, cuya historia de heroísmo en Afganistán se le dice en su libro "Lone Survivor", compartió su visión del mundo en el evento de la Asociación Nacional del Rifle en Louisville el 16 de mayo 2008

http://www.eyeblast.tv/public/video.aspx?RsrcID=2507

doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Lun 11 Abr 2011 - 15:01







GulaB el pastor pashtun,jefe del poblado que acogio y protegio a Marcus Luttrell

doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por SiX el Mar 12 Abr 2011 - 3:04

Tremendo!!

Ahh y esa es la marca de las camisetas cuyo link pusiste hace no mucho! Smile







...............................
"Que le den por culo al Pato Mickey"

http://www.facebook.com/pages/SEAL-Team-Spartan/216455738374002

Keep Low. Move Fast. Kill First. Die Last. One Shot. One Kill. No Luck. Pure Skill.

SiX
ALPHA Squad · S06

Mensajes : 12404
Fecha de inscripción : 01/05/2010
Edad : 27
Localización : Málaga

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por Facer el Mar 12 Abr 2011 - 3:39

Entre estas y las del mapa del otro post..... acojonan.... De donde sacas estas fotos???

Facer

Mensajes : 363
Fecha de inscripción : 30/09/2010
Edad : 37
Localización : Huelva

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Mar 12 Abr 2011 - 5:11

De conocidos de internet XD

doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Mar 12 Abr 2011 - 5:12

Bueno la del mapa ya rulaba por ahi!

doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por Facer el Sáb 18 Jun 2011 - 5:48

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QanOI9crF1s&feature=related

Alguien sabe donde pillar el libro traducido???

Facer

Mensajes : 363
Fecha de inscripción : 30/09/2010
Edad : 37
Localización : Huelva

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por SiX el Sáb 18 Jun 2011 - 6:03

Buen vídeo!

Pues creo que no hay traducción del libro de Luttrell.







...............................
"Que le den por culo al Pato Mickey"

http://www.facebook.com/pages/SEAL-Team-Spartan/216455738374002

Keep Low. Move Fast. Kill First. Die Last. One Shot. One Kill. No Luck. Pure Skill.

SiX
ALPHA Squad · S06

Mensajes : 12404
Fecha de inscripción : 01/05/2010
Edad : 27
Localización : Málaga

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Mar 4 Oct 2011 - 11:30



When Marcus concluded his speech at the Lone Survivor Gala last month, his twin brother Morgan (also a SEAL) came up to the stage to speak to Marcus. Morgan told us that thru the years, he and Marcus had frequently grabbed each other’s gear by accident. The last time he deployed, he realized that he had one of Marcus’ packs that included what I believe you call an H vest. He said that when he pulled it out of the pack, he realized that it was the vest from Operation Red Wings. It had the lanyard he made for his emergency beacon and orders from ORW. It was the first time Marcus had seen it since ORW. He pulled the vest out of the pack and pulled it up to his nose and held it there. The room was absolutely silent – no one was breathing. He looked up from the vest and said “This is what hell smells like” and left the stage. There wasn’t a dry eye in the place

doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por Hell_Noize el Mar 4 Oct 2011 - 20:45

Una pregunta gente, Marcus dejó el NSW por incapacidad o...? no tengo ni idea y estaría bien saberlo.

Hell_Noize

Mensajes : 3327
Fecha de inscripción : 06/04/2011
Edad : 32
Localización : Madrid

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por SiX el Mar 4 Oct 2011 - 22:13

Emotivo cuanto menos.

Pues, según wikipedia:
He separated from the Navy in 2007, and was subsequently granted a temporary medical retirement through the Board for the Correction of Naval Records in 2009 .







...............................
"Que le den por culo al Pato Mickey"

http://www.facebook.com/pages/SEAL-Team-Spartan/216455738374002

Keep Low. Move Fast. Kill First. Die Last. One Shot. One Kill. No Luck. Pure Skill.

SiX
ALPHA Squad · S06

Mensajes : 12404
Fecha de inscripción : 01/05/2010
Edad : 27
Localización : Málaga

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por Hell_Noize el Mar 4 Oct 2011 - 22:39

Vamos, que se fué por su propio pie.

Hell_Noize

Mensajes : 3327
Fecha de inscripción : 06/04/2011
Edad : 32
Localización : Madrid

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por Facer el Jue 6 Oct 2011 - 2:44

Tiene que ser fuerte tener esos recuerdos el la cabeza, pero mas fuerte aun tener algo en tus manos que "huela a ese infierno"!!!.
Mis respetos.

Facer

Mensajes : 363
Fecha de inscripción : 30/09/2010
Edad : 37
Localización : Huelva

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por Hell_Noize el Jue 6 Oct 2011 - 3:45

Sin duda, pero si ser Seal era parte de su vida, creo que la mejor manera de rendir tributo a sus compañeros caídos era seguir en el equipo, pero bueno...así lo veo yo y esa es mi opinión personal, que nadie se me tire encima.

Hell_Noize

Mensajes : 3327
Fecha de inscripción : 06/04/2011
Edad : 32
Localización : Madrid

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Mar 28 Feb 2012 - 2:07



doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por doc_breacher el Jue 22 Mar 2012 - 10:37




doc_breacher
ALPHA Squad · S08

Mensajes : 9248
Fecha de inscripción : 02/05/2010
Edad : 29
Localización : melilla

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: POFC. MARCUS LUTTRELL

Mensaje por Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 2:42


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.